July 4, 1908

by Nancy Freeze I love reading old articles from the Beacon, and last week, I stumbled across a story of a past July 4th celebration. I am continuously amazed at the energy of the early settlers. Their lives were filled with hard work and long hours, and yet they still found time to decorate floats, dress in costume, and organize games. It was reported that, “July 4, 1908, at Mendocino has gone into history as having been one of the learn more…

Mendocino Peace Fair

June 29, 1966 – A Peace Fair opened at the Mendocino Coast Gallery located on the northwest corner of Main and Lansing streets. Running thru July 4th, the theme of the fair was “Peace and War,” and its purpose was to explore the critical issues involved in the search for peace during the Vietnam War era. Sandra Hahn opened the fair with a short speech in which she said, “Our being here is frankly, to put ourselves out of business. learn more…

The Eugene Brown House

Looking northeast towards the Eugene Brown House, located at 45120 Main Street, Mendocino, c. 1973. (Gift of Beth Stebbins) Albert Maxwell constructed this two-story home for Eugene Brown in 1878. At that time, Eugene owned and operated the mercantile store just to the west. Eugene and his mother were living in Pine Grove, but his mother wanted to live in town. Eugene Brown died in 1920, and the property went to his wife, Emily van Dusen Brown. There were no learn more…

Joe Nichols’ Poolroom

Joe Nichols’ Poolroom in Skating Rink Hall in Mendocino, c. 1910. Between 1909 and 1918, Joseph H. Nichols operated a poolroom, concession stand, and moving-picture theatre in the building located on the southwest corner of Ukiah and Lansing Streets. Skating Rink Hall was built by William H. Kelley in 1887 to serve as a dance hall and recreation center. Kelley’s daughter, Daisy MacCallum, remodeled the building in 1950 and renamed it Kellieowen (pronounced kelly-owen) Hall, a combination of Daisy’s own learn more…

Tom Doyle Lands Big Fish

June 21, 1919 – Thomas Doyle, sawyer at the Mendocino Lumber Company mill, caught a 32-pound codfish “in a crab net off the boom-sticks at the mill. Tom thought he had netted a submarine or a trunk of buried treasure when he started to haul in the net. When the big fish came to the surface he made such a struggle that he almost threw his captor overboard. Tom called for help and a bystander went out with a sledge learn more…

Silver Workman’s Key-wind Pocket Watch

Silver workman’s key-wind pocket watch, manufactured by the American Watch Company between 1890 and 1910 and owned by Antone Carvalho. Watch has a leather strap with key, two bottom hinges to open face, and top strap loop, white face with black roman numerals and a “seconds” dial, on face. Inscription on watch says “Am Watch Co., Waltham.” This was a classic workman’s watch and was common among the loggers and mill workers in the 1800’s and early 1900’s. (Gift of learn more…

Piccolotti Children Fishing at Boyle’s Camp, c. 1928

Piccolotti Children Fishing at Boyle’s Camp, c. 1928. The children are standing on what appears to be a wharf or bridge with a wooden railing, and are holding up several strings of small fish they have presumably caught from Big River. A fishing pole is held upright by one child. The youngest are wearing overalls, and some are barefoot.  Pete Piccolotti, his wife Rosa, and their family of eight children lived on what used to be the Mendocino Lumber Company’s learn more…

Main Street, c. 1934

Main Street in Mendocino looking east, c. 1934. Chet Bishop’s General Store can be seen at the far left. The next building to its right is the Remedy Store with its distinctive round sign in front on the street. The buildings on the right, on the south side of Main Street, were owned by the Union Lumber Company, later Boise-Cascade, and were removed over time, the last one in 1961. Note the concrete sidewalks on either side of the unpaved learn more…

Sheriff Raids Illicit Liquor Sellers

June 13, 1913 – Mendocino County Sheriff Ralph Byrnes raided the homes and businesses of Joseph Granskog and Michael Nolan, searching for contraband liquor. Alcohol sales were banned in Mendocino in 1909, long before National Prohibition took effect in 1920. Armed with search warrants issued by Judge William True Wallace, “the Sheriff, his deputy, and a representative of the Beacon descended upon Granskog’s place, taking the proprietor completely by surprise. When the Sheriff entered the door, he greeted Granskog pleasantly, learn more…

Work That Has No End

June 12, 1885 – Inez Milliken Philbrick was born in Mendocino, the third of six children born to James and Lizzie Milliken. Inez grew up in Mendocino, graduating from Mendocino High School in 1904. After attending San Jose Normal School (now San Jose State University) to obtain her teaching degree, she returned to Mendocino County to teach in the local schools. Inez married John Philbrick in 1909 and moved to a ranch in Comptche. In the early 1970s, she wrote learn more…