Mendocino Medicine and Gazetteer

Ever hear of the Mendocino Medicine and Gazetteer? It was created by Dr. Richard White, who practiced medicine on the coast 45 years ago. A man of many interests, White started it in 1976 as a journal of rural medicine, and it grew to encompass a world of topics. White’s intent was a publication that would serve as a means of communication between Mendocino Coast District Hospital, Sherwood Oaks Health Center, and local specialized health agencies to exchange philosophies about learn more…

Schools with an Ocean View

At the Kelley House we were given a photograph with no caption, showing a teacher standing in front of a one-room schoolhouse with her students. But where is this place? The background was open clear sky which led us to believe it was a coastal school on a bluff, but which one? And how many coastal view schools were there? Turns out there were close to 30 of them on our county coastline, and here they are, north to south. learn more…

Railroads and Timberlands

How many readers are aware that Southern Pacific Railroad owned a good chunk of the land between the Albion and Navarro Rivers out to Comptche? No, the company wasn’t planning to build an extension of their railroad on this land…they needed timber. If a company is going to build a railroad, first the tracks are built. Bridges and tunnels often need constructing, and that requires lumber. Railroad iron track is laid on wooden ties. All these timber products need to learn more…

Finding Heeser’s Math Book

The staff at the Kelley House Museum never cease to be amazed by the material the public presents to us as gifts. Take Auggie Heeser’s book, “First Lessons in Arithmetic” by William J. Milne, Ph. D., LL D. given to us by former Mendocino resident Deborah White. As a former College of the Redwoods math instructor, somebody bought it for her as a gift – a price of $3.95 is penciled in it. She in turn thought the Kelley House learn more…

South Coast Libraries

Over the past few weeks or so the history of libraries on the Mendocino Coast has been explored in this Kelley House column. Here is the last segment on library growth on the South Coast. Given that there were reading rooms before there were libraries it seems likely they existed, however briefly, in Little River, Albion, Greenwood-Elk, and perhaps Manchester. The Little River Improvement Club’s meeting house, which is now a museum, had a library at one time. Greenwood Elk learn more…

Coastal Libraries, Part Three

Fort Bragg’s Library History The Kelley House Museum has been researching the growth and development of library services on the Mendocino Coast. This week the city of Fort Bragg gets the attention. As mentioned in previous segments of this series, “reading rooms” played a big part in the founding of libraries. Fraternal organizations often had such informal libraries as part of their meeting locations. In 1890 the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union sponsored a reading room in the White House Hotel at learn more…

Coastal Libraries, Part Two

Libraries Arrive on the Coast Looking at how libraries arrived on the Mendocino Coast is part of an on-going series exploring the growth of libraries. This week’s story is part two and is a peek into the importance of fraternal organizations and a bookmobile. Fraternal organizations gave a sense of “family” to newcomers arriving on the coast. They could be based on religion, language, politics, educational goals, military service, social views and more. Many survive to this day. The Masonic learn more…

Coastal Libraries, Part One

Today when coastal residents want to read a new best seller, or find a Book-On-CD to listen to while commuting, or search for a good books on bugs for a six year old, they can turn to the libraries in their local communities. (We’re pretending there is not a pandemic going on that limits access to library services and buildings.)  How, and when, did the coast get libraries? For the next few weeks, the Kelley House Calendar will look at learn more…

Coastal Place Names Part 2

A recent column explored the sources of names on the land from Needle Rock south to Caspar on the Mendocino Coast. This week’s column tells the story of place names from Pine Grove south to Gualala. Plan a road trip and find these interesting places. Pine Grove probably had a pine tree grove and Russian Gulch was supposed to have been settled by a Russian man escaped from Fort Ross in Sonoma County.  Little River has a little river and learn more…

Coastal Place Names Part 1

Maps are a time trap for historians…just ask the folks at the Kelley House Museum. A map inspection can turn from a quick glance to an hour or more of in-depth inspection, often with the assistance of a magnifying lens. And what captures this author is the names on the land. For whom, and what, was a placed named, and what work took place there. This will be a two-part series with place names from Needle Rock on the Humboldt learn more…